Posts Tagged ‘Sydney’

Grand Final marketing dominated by .com.au domain names

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Adrian KinderisBy Adrian Kinderis

This year’s AFL and NRL Grand Finals set viewership records for the number of people who tuned in to watch the matches.

A whopping 4.6 million people watched the Rabbitohs beat the Bulldogs on Sunday night, making it the highest rating television program this year. Meanwhile, the AFL Grand Final saw 4.2 million people tune in, which is no mean feat either.

Clearly, our footy finals represent the premier stage for high-reach, large-impact television advertising in Australia.

As I do every year, I wanted to see how advertisers in Australia use the AFL and NRL Grand Finals to engage viewers, deliver a compelling message, and most importantly generate a call to action.

Here’s what I found:

The stats

Like in previous years, .com.au domain names were the primary call to action seen in the ads for both Grand Finals. Out of the 55 ads aired during the games, 41% included a .com.au domain name while only 12% referred to a .com domain name.

Domain names were clearly the best on ground in terms of advertising call to actions. While social media holds a prominent place in advertising nowadays, it was left on the bench during the Grand Finals, with less than 10% of ads referencing either Twitter or Facebook.

This is remarkably consistent with what we saw in 2013 and 2012.

Telephone numbers, mobile apps and search were the remaining calls to actions seen, while a quarter of ads chose to run with no call to action.

Implications

As I’ve reported over a number of years now, domain names – and in particular .com.au domain names – remain the mainstay of marketing calls to action.

The most interesting observation is the decline in use of social media in advertising. Despite all the hype around social, it appears marketers have reverted back to the tried and tested formula of domain names. Social has its place, it’s just not in Grand Final TV advertising.

To me, this suggests that marketers still believe that the website remains a foundation of any direct response lead marketing strategy, especially when a 15- or 30-second ad slot costs upwards of $100,000.

Social as a call to action

It seems the novelty of social has abated and Australian marketers are now integrating social as part of a wider digital strategy, instead of splashing it around in every advertising campaign.

On almost all occasions, social was introduced in conjunction with the domain name and not instead of it. This shows that marketers now have a greater appreciation of the role domain names and websites play in generating awareness and education, and the role social media plays in encouraging engagement and conversations.

Social has a place; it just isn’t the only place for a brand to exist.

Search as a call to action

One trend I have been following closely this year is the emergence of search-based calls to action. I was pleased to see that there was a stark drop in search calls to action in the advertisements at this year’s Grand Finals.

Brands such as Holden, ANZ, BMW, Harvey Norman and many others are increasingly ditching domain names in favour of directing viewers to use a search engine like Google to find their website.

I’ve been a vocal critic of search-based calls to action (as you can read here in my blog) because I think they’re ineffective, unnecessary and provide competitors an opportunity to steal your customers.

For instance, in the NRL Grand Final, Holden directed viewers to search for ‘VF Changes Minds”. This is difficult for viewers to remember during an ad break and if they do get a chance to search for the term (as I did), they’ll also be exposed to a competitive environment and view search results from news stories, Holden dealers and automotive forums.

There’s no guarantee that searching for “VF Changes Minds” will result in someone visiting the Holden website and I think the practice is a wasted opportunity for customer engagement.

2015 Grand Finals

It is clear that domain names will continue their dominance and I don’t expect any changes here come 2015.

.com.au is Australia’s home on the Internet and it will remain the authoritative source of truth for Australian businesses online. When given the chance to engage with more than 4 million Australian TV viewers, a .com.au domain name is the perfect call to action.

What will change by 2015 is the domain name landscape and the creative options marketers have at their disposal.

Right now, the first of hundreds of new Top-Level Domains such as .melbourne, .sydney and .afl are being launched, offering marketers an additional option in their ‘.menu’ of calls to action.

Only last week we launched the .melbourne Top-Level Domain and savvy brands such as the Bank of Melbourne, Melbourne Festival, Flower Drum Restaurant and The Marriner Group have become some of the first businesses to adopt a .melbourne web address. Check out www.live.melbourne for more information.

Come Grand Final time 2015, we expect many more major brands to be sporting a .melbourne, .sydney or any other type of new domain name alongside their .com.au web address.

There are many benefits for adopting one of these new domains, from potential improvements to SEO and message recall, to being able to get the exact match name you always wanted.

It will be interesting to analyse the impact of new Top-Level Domains next year and I hope to see a .melbourne or .sydney domain featured next in year’s Grand Finals.

By Adrian Kinderis
CEO of ARI Registry Services

Marketers place trust in domain names for AFL Grand Final

Wednesday, October 2nd, 2013

Adrian KinderisAnother year, another grand final and another win for domain names. Adrian Kinderis, CEO of ARI Registry Services, says domain names are the premiers as Australia’s marketers again show a preference for using .com.au as the preferred call to action in AFL Grand Final ads.

By Adrian Kinderis

It surprises me that our local marketing industry hasn’t yet embraced the AFL and NRL Grand Finals as the marketers in the US do for the Super Bowl.

Where’s the hype like you see for the Super Bowl? I think our footy finals represent the premier stage for high-reach, large-impact television advertising in Australia. We should see the country’s best marketers sporting their wares.

They certainly have a good reason to. More than 3.6 million Australians tuned in on Saturday for the AFL Grand Final, representing more than 80% of all free-to-air viewers for the time slot.

As I do every year, I wanted to see how advertisers in Australia use the AFL Grand Final to engage viewers, deliver a compelling message, and most importantly generate a call to action.

Here’s what I found…

The statistics

Like in previous years, domain names were the primary call to action seen in Grand Final ads. Out of the 34 ads aired during the game, 40% included a domain name while only 9% referred to social media.

This is remarkably consistent with what we saw last year with almost identical figures (38% and 9% respectively).

The other significant calls to action exercised this year included of telephone numbers (14%), search (9%) and mobile apps (7%). Interestingly, 21% of ads did not include any call to action.

Within domain names, marketers clearly showed a preference for .com.au in their ads, with more than 70% directing viewers to a .com.au website. Again, this is almost identical to last year.

What does this mean?

Clearly, social media has its place, but it’s not in Grand Final marketing.

Despite all the hype and importance of social media to modern day brand communication, domain names still remain the primary call to action. While we saw NAB make effective use of a Twitter hashtag in their Footify campaign, they largely stood alone on this front.

To me, this suggests that marketers still believe that the website remains a foundation of any direct response lead marketing strategy, especially when a 15- or 30-second ad slot costs up to $100,000.

However, it was interesting to see the rise of search which tallied a 7% rise in the number of ads directing viewers to use a search engine like Google to find their website. The Australian Defence Force and Holden were the major brands utilising this method.

I’ve been a vocal critic (as you can read in my recent Marketing Magazine blog) of this emerging trend, and these statistics confirm my observations that marketers are relying on search in greater numbers. It is narrow minded, short sighted thinking and it needs to change.

Future trends

It’s my prediction that marketers will make a big splash for the 2014 AFL and NRL Grand Finals.

It is clear that domain names will continue their dominance and I don’t expect any changes here. Domain names will remain the authoritative source of truth on the Internet. After all, they represent the trusted directory service of the Internet. What will change is the domain name landscape and the creative options marketers have at their disposal.

By early 2014, the first of hundreds of new Top-Level Domains such as .melbourne, .sydney and .afl will be launched, offering marketers an additional option in their menu of calls to action.

One of the benefits of new Top-Level Domains for marketers will be the ability to integrate tailored domain name calls to action for every campaign with greater ease and creativity.

In Australia, local brands such as the AFL, TAB, iiNet, ANZ and RMIT are leading the way with these new domains. While they were unable to integrate their new Top-Level Domain into their TVCs in this year’s Grand Final, it is encouraging that in the coming years we could see domain names such as sponsor.afl, product.tab or promotion.rmit on our TV screens.

If you take this year’s TVCs as an example, it is possible that in the future we could see the TAB use a domain name call to action tailored specifically for the Grand Final, such as www.grandfinal.tab or even specific content like www.firstgoal.tab. This would allow the TAB to deliver a highly personal experience and enable viewers to intuitively navigate to relevant content.

Also, brands that have not purchased their own .brand domain can purchase domain names under .melbourne or .sydney to create targeted campaigns that have a direct affiliation with either city.

It will be interesting to analyse the impact new Top-Level Domains will have on advertising once they start to appear on the Internet from next year. From what I’ve seen from those preparing to launch, I think we’ll see some innovative approaches applied to the marketing for the 2014 Grand Final.

By Adrian Kinderis
CEO of ARI Registry Services

IDN ccTLD Fast Track update

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

By Jon Lawrence

The introduction of Internationalised Domain Names (IDNs) as Top Level Domains is one of the most significant developments in the short history of the internet and represents a fundamental improvement in user experience for the billions of people worldwide whose native languages use non-Latin character sets.

As part of its public consultation process, ICANN has just released a (third) revised version of the Draft Implementation Plan for the IDN ccTLD Fast Track Process. This program has been designed by ICANN to allow the rapid introduction of a small number of IDN country-code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs), in advance of the resolution of the outstanding policy and technical issues.

A public comment period will now run through the next ICANN Meeting in Sydney (21st to 26th June) until the 15th July 2009.  The aim is to finalise the Fast Track process by the ICANN meeting in Seoul in October 2009, with the first IDN ccTLD set to be implemented soon after that.

This version of the Draft Implementation Plan is the last draft to be issued and many of the issues from previous drafts are now considered resolved, based on feedback from the ICANN community.  Additionally, supporting documents on the following topics have been published to inform participants about the outstanding issues:
•    Definition of the relationship between ICANN and IDN ccTLD managers
•    Proposed financial contributions (to ICANN) from IDN ccTLD managers
•    The process for handling contention issues with existing TLDs and new gTLD applications
•    The development and usage of IDN tables and character variants

We strongly support the Fast Track process and are generally pleased with the progress that has been made to this point.  There is a great deal of technical and policy complexity involved in the issue and ICANN have been carefully negotiating all of the hurdles in front of them.  For example, character variants which form just a part of the process are likely to be a headache for ccTLD managers wishing to implement an IDN ccTLD.

Our development team have just finalised the upgrades to our Registry Systems to support IDN ccTLDs, working initially with our clients in the United Arab Emirates to provide an Arabic ccTLD.  The team came up with some innovative solutions that provide the high levels of flexibility and configurability needed to manage the significant policy complexities with IDNs, without sacrificing on our high system performance standards.

We look forward to watching the ongoing development of IDNs and working with our clients around the world to help them deliver world class Registry Services.

Please see our IDN page for more information about our IDN capabilities, or Contact Us to enquire about how we can assist you with your TLD.

For more detail and to review the Draft Implementation Plan and supporting documentation, please see ICANN’s announcement.

See also the Fast Track webpage.

Welcome!

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2009

By Adrian Kinderis

Welcome to the AusRegistry International blog! We’ll be posting here regularly with timely industry updates, what we’re working on and other posts of interest. Please subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up to date, or check back here regularly.

New website layout

As you can see, we’ve just released an updated version of our website with improved segmentation for different types of TLDs, as well as additional information about our newly-released IDN capabilities. Please have a look around and complete our contact form if you’d like more information about any of our services or are interested in arranging a demonstration of our systems.

Twitter

If you’re a Twitter user, simply go to http://twitter.com/ausregistryint to follow our tweets. We’ll be linking back to stories on the blog so that’s another easy way to stay up to date.

ICANN Sydney Meeting

As part of the Host Committee for the next ICANN Meeting in Sydney (22-26  June), we’re busy helping to organise what we expect to be an interesting and constructive meeting. We’ll be blogging and twittering throughout the session to keep you up to date on developments, if you’re not able to make it. If you are coming to Sydney, please drop past our booth and say hello.

Check out the meeting website.